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From the Editor
Editor's Note
 
Memory News
Fatty food weighs down muscles and memory
 
Pumping Neurons: Exercise to maintain a healthy brain
The evidence is growing that moderate regular exercise boosts memory and other brain functions and may help prevent age-related declines.
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How Parkinsonís disease affects the mind

It’s not just a movement disorder. Besides causing tremors and other motion-related symptoms, Parkinson’s disease affects memory, learning, and behavior.

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Creative healing: art therapy for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias
As medical science races to cure dementia, storytelling and other creative activities promise a better quality of life for the millions already diagnosed.
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Memory Tip
Medicate Your Memory
Glossary
Encephalitis
 

Encephalitis is the medical term for an inflammation of the brain, derived from the Greek words enkephalos (brain) and itis (inflammation). Inflammation causes swelling, and as brain tissues press against their limited confines in the skull, those tissues can be damaged.

Encephalitis is often caused by a virus spreading into the brain; the most common such cause is herpes simplex encephalitis. Viruses such as influenza (flu), measles, chickenpox, smallpox, and syphilis can all cause encephalitis. Encephalitis can also be caused by a head wound that penetrates to the brain and becomes infected, or by infection elsewhere that gets into the bloodstream and is carried to the brain. HIV- the virus leading to AIDS - can also weaken the immune system, allowing various other infections to spread into the brain.

Symptoms can range from cold-like headache, fever and dizziness to more serious motor dysfunction, paralysis and coma. If the underlying cause is treated promptly, outlook for recovery is generally good; left untreated, encephalitis can cause irreparable brain damage or even death.

 

by Catherine E. Myers. Copyright © 2006 Memory Loss and the Brain