Get Your FREE subscription today
Current Issues Past Issues Who We Are Resources Get Involved Glossary
 
From the Editor
Editor's Note
 
Memory News
Fatty food weighs down muscles and memory
 
Pumping Neurons: Exercise to maintain a healthy brain
The evidence is growing that moderate regular exercise boosts memory and other brain functions and may help prevent age-related declines.
Go to Article >>
 
How Parkinsonís disease affects the mind

It’s not just a movement disorder. Besides causing tremors and other motion-related symptoms, Parkinson’s disease affects memory, learning, and behavior.

Go to Article >>

 
Creative healing: art therapy for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias
As medical science races to cure dementia, storytelling and other creative activities promise a better quality of life for the millions already diagnosed.
Go to Article >>
 
Memory Tip
Medicate Your Memory
Glossary
Blood pressure
 

Blood pressure is, quite literally, the pressure of blood as it flows through arteries in the body. Although a certain minimum blood pressure is required for normal function, usually low blood pressure is associated with good health and longevity. Blood pressure that is above the normal range can be associated with various health risks including heart attack and stroke.

Blood pressure can be influenced by a variety of factors, which can be transient or long-term. Stress, excitement and physical exertion typically raise blood pressure, as blood is pumped faster through the body; blood pressure may fall during subsequent relaxation. Smoking cigarettes or drinking coffee may raise blood pressure for as long as the drug (nicotine or caffeine) is in the body. Obesity, high levels of cholesterol, and diabetes all tend to raise blood pressure. Atherosclerosis, a buildup of cholesterol and calcium deposits inside the artery, narrows the passageways through which blood can flow, increasing the pressure and possibly reducing the volume of blood that can pass through the artery.

by Catherine E. Myers. Copyright © 2006 Memory Loss and the Brain